Film Screening – “The 30th of May”

September 26th, 2016 by fannielou

Wednesday, November 9, 2016 at 6:00 p.m., The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO will host a film screening of “The 30th of May.” For over 100 years, the city of Natchez had two Memorial Day celebrations—one black and one white. By the mid-1990's, the white celebration faded away, while the black celebration known as the "30th of May" continued to march on.  Virtually unknown outside of the region, this annual event is passed down from generation to generation giving evidence that the roots of patriotism run deep in the Mississippi River towns of Vidalia, Louisiana and Natchez, Mississippi. 

Using animation, archival and aerial footage, and interviews with veterans, organizers and participants, the "30th of May" documentary brings to life the remarkable untold story of this African American-led patriotic tradition in the Deep South. It's a tradition like no other on the country. 

 

On Thursday, October 6, 2016, the Hamer Institute will partner with the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Garden and Museum Foundation in celebrating the 99th birthday of Fannie Lou Hamer in Ruleville, MS. Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights leader who was born and raised in Mississippi and was instrumental in forming the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and leading the MFDP delegates to challenge the all-white Mississippi delegation at the 1964 National Convention held in Atlantic City.  In recognition of this great civil rights icon, the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO will begin celebrating and commemorating the centennial of Fannie Lou Hamer through a series of programming and exhibitions beginning in January 2017. Please stay tuned… 

On Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at 10:00 am, The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO will unveil a COFO freedom trail marker. The Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) has been awarded a historic designation on the Mississippi Freedom Trail.  The Mississippi Freedom Trails program is a program of Visit Mississippi (Mississippi Development Authority/Division of Tourism) that celebrates and honors sites in the state of Mississippi that hold historical significance.  This is a special honor for Jackson State University because it will be one of a few institutions serving as the home to two markers. 

As one of the most visible programs of the Mississippi Historical Commission (MHC), historical markers commemorate diverse topics, including the history and architecture of houses, commercial and public buildings, religious congregations, and military sites.  The program also honors events that changed the course of local and state history and individuals who contributed to our state, community organizations, and businesses.  The COFO Building is on the national register of historic places; COFO served as the umbrella organization for civil rights organizations working in Mississippi during the mid-1960s. It’s headquarters located at 1017 John R. Lynch Street was the location of the office for the Mississippi Movement from 1963 to 1965.  “Jackson State University committed to saving this national treasure from dilapidation, renovated the interior and exterior, and re- opened the COFO Building in 2011 as a Civil Rights Education Center, symbolizing the university's commitment to historic preservation.” – Dr. Rico D. Chapman, Director, Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO, Human & Civil Rights Education Center

freedom-trail-marker-unveiling

On Wednesday, September 24, 2016, at 1:00 pm, in the Dollye M.E. Robinson Liberal Arts Building, room 166/266,  the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute and the Department of History and Philosophy will host an Authors Book Talk featuring Ibram X. Kendi and his book, Stamped From the Beginning.

Young black men are 21 times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts. The unemployment rate for African Americans has been double that of whites for more than half a century. Award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in STAMPED FROM THE BEGINNING: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, that if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society.stamped-from-the-beginning-book-talk-jsu8-11

The historic significance of the newest and 19th Smithsonian museum – and its importance to all Americans – will make this GRAND OPENING an unprecedented local, national and international event unlike any other opening of a cultural institution in America or globally in recent history. Across the country and around the world, watch parties and other signature events are being organized by local museums, individuals or corporations as co-celebrants with the NMAAHC Grand Opening. 


Please join

The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO

for

the NMAAHC Grand Opening Watch Party

 Saturday, September 24, 2016nmaahc-grand-opening

 

9:00am

1017 John R. Lynch Street

Jackson, MS 39217

Breakfast will be provided. 

The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO 

The Institute for Social Justice and Race Relations

Features

Mukasa Dada (aka Willie Ricks)

during the

Summer Youth Workshop: The Pivotal Role of Young People

AND

The 50th Commemoration of the March Against Fear and the Call for Black Power

The rallying cry for the Black Power movement took place in the context of the Mississippi southern civil rights struggle of the mid 1960s. James Meredith set out to march from the Mississippi-Tennessee state line to Jackson, Mississippi. Meredith wanted to demonstrate, in 1966, that Mississippi was a changed state, and that it was safe for a Black man to walk the highways and byways of his native state without being harassed or killed. On the next day, Mr. Meredith was shot outside of Hernando, Mississippi, in DeSoto County. This self-proclaimed “walk against fear” contributed to the development of “Black Power” in Mississippi.

During the 2016 Summer Youth Workshop: The Pivotal Role of Young People, not only will participants be introduced to a mantra that helped to move the Mississippi freedom struggle forward, but the mantra will be presented by one of the originators, Mukasa Dada (aka Mr. Willie Ricks). This session will be held on Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at 10:45 am

Later that evening,  Mukasa Dada will join a panel to discuss The Evolution of the March Against Fear and the Black Power Freedom Struggle. This  inter-generational dialogue will take place at the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO located at 1017 John R. Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, 39217 at 6:00 pm

The evening event is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Refreshments will be served.

  For a complete schedule of events including invited guests and contact information for more commemorative events, please visit: www.jsums.edu/HamerInstitute/BlackPower2016 or contact

The Hamer Institute @ COFO; 601-979-1563 or 601-979-4348 or email: COFO.Center@jsums.edu

Willie Ricks and Black Power

The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO

The Institute for Social Justice and Race Relations

Present

The JSU Campus Reading Community Book Discussion

“The State of Health and Healthcare in Mississippi”

Featuring Dr. Mario J. Azevedo

 

The Jackson State University Campus Reading Community was launched in Fall 2010 here at Jackson State University. Its vision is to inspire reading throughout the JSU campus and the surrounding community.  Having discussed books such as Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois, Lynch Street by Tim Spofford, Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr by Michael V. Williams, James Meredith; Warrior and the America That Created Him, by Meredith Coleman McGee, this Reading Community has been a way to stimulate the intellectual discourse on the campus and surrounding communities.

Please join us Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 6:00 pm in the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO exhibit room located at 1017 John R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS

In this session of the 2015-2016 academic year, The JSU Campus Reading Community will discuss his book, The State of Health and Healthcare in Mississippi featuring Dr. Mario J. Azevedo, Professor and Dean, The College of Liberal Arts, Jackson State University.

This multidisciplinary book provides the most accurate and most recent information on health and health care in the state of Mississippi. The editor and contributors explain why the state finds itself in precarious health conditions and reveal the prevailing circumstances as the state debates a path toward a comprehensive health care system for its citizens. 

For more information or if you have any questions regarding the Series, please feel free to contact us at 601-979-1563 or 601-979-4348 or email: COFO.Center@jsums.edu

Please visit: www.jsums.edu/HamerInstitute for more details.

Health and Healthcare in Mississippi 4.7.2016

 

Summer Youth Workshop Poster 2016

 

The Southern Civil Rights Movement: The Pivotal Role of Young People is a six-day (6) workshop designed for middle and high-school students (7th – 12th graders) interested in learning about the contributions and sacrifices made by people who were their age during the Civil Rights Movement. Participants in the intensive workshop will be guided through the history of the movement via lectures, oral history panels, and group and individual work. The workshop will also explore the nature of American democracy and how engaged citizens can advance democratic ideals in the face of resistance and oppression. 

The 2016 event is scheduled for Monday, June 13th  – Saturday, June 18, 2016, 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., and will be held on the campus of Jackson State University, COFO Civil Rights Education Center, 1017 John R. Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi. The cost for this workshop is $150.00. The workshop will  feature field trips to civil rights landmarks in Jackson, MS, Canton, MS, The Mississippi Delta and Memphis, TN. Students will also be encouraged to participate in a service learning project.   Other benefits of the workshop include:

  1. Notebook and Learning materials;
  2. Lunches, T-shirts and Field trips; and
  3. A workshop ending program conducted the Hamer Institute faculty and students.

If you have a child or know a child in middle school or high school (7th – 12th graders), we are hoping that you will encourage him/her to apply for the workshop because we believe it is an outstanding way for them to advance socially and educationally over the summer break. 

2016 Summer Youth Workshop – The Southern Civil Rights Movement





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The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO

The Institute for Social Justice and Race Relations And the College of Education and Human Development Hosts

The JSU Campus Reading Community Book Discussion

Between the World and Me

By Ta-Nehisi Coates”

 

The Jackson State University Campus Reading Community was launched in Fall 2010 here at Jackson State University. Its vision is to inspire reading throughout the JSU campus and the surrounding community.  Having discussed books such as Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr , The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois, Lynch Street by Tim Spofford, Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr by Michael V. Williams, and James Meredith: Warrior and the America That Created Him, by Meredith Coleman McGee,   this Reading Community has been a way to stimulate the intellectual discourse on the campus and surrounding communities.

Please join us Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 6:00 pm in the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO exhibit room.

In this session of the 2015-2016 academic year, The JSU Campus Reading Community will discuss the book, Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Between the World and Me is written as a letter to the author's teenage son about the feelings, symbolism, and realities associated with being black in the United States. Coates recapitulates the American history of violence against black people and the incommensurate policing of black youth. A common theme is his fear of bodily harm. Coates draws from an abridged, autobiographical account of his youth in Baltimore. The work takes inspiration from James Baldwin's 1963 The Fire Next Time. Like Baldwin, Coates does not share in traditional black Christian rhetoric of uplift, and more bleakly believes that no major change in racial justice is likely to come.

This book was written as an open letter from the author to his 15 year old son in hopes that he could begin to understand race in the world as a person of color. "I tell you now that the question of how one should live within a black body, within a country lost in the Dream, is the question of my life… " boldly written with instances we can all relate to as men of color in our pursuit of the American Dream.says Dr. Rodney Washington, Associate Professor, Elementary & Early Childhood, College of Education and Human Development, Jackson State University.

For more information or if you have any questions regarding the Series, please feel free to contact us at 601-979-1563 or 601-979-4348 or email: COFO.Center@jsums.edu

Please visit: www.jsums.edu/HamerInstitute for more details.

 

Between the World and Me

The Fannie Lou Hamer Institute @ COFO and The Institute for Social Justice and Race in conjunction with Astro Blackness present

2016 Planet Deep South Colloquium: Speculative Cultural Production and Africanisms in the American Black South.

Planet Deep South is an interdisciplinary colloquium open to all scholars, artists, and students that explore the intellectual and creative expression of African people through a series of panel discussions designed to inspire the inquiry of southern Black cultural production through a historical and speculative lens.  Through an Afro-futuristic outlook, thinkers, writers, musicians and artists envision a Pan African world that is diverse yet specific; imagined, yet real, grounded yet unlimited, extending beyond region, space, and time.

This event will take place on the campus of Jackson State University, February 24th – February 26, 2016. For more information, please visit: http://www.jsums.edu/hamerinstitute/planet-deep-south/