Archive for January, 2017

The History Department at Mississippi State University invites undergraduate scholars to submit papers for the ninth annual Symposium for History Undergraduate Research (SHUR). The symposium, "Looking Back to the Future: Examining the Anomalies of the Past," will provide students with the opportunity to present their research in the format of an academic history conference and have their work discussed by Mississippi State history professors. The event is scheduled for April 28-29, 2017, on the Mississippi State University campus in Starkville.

Papers are welcome on any historical topic, but especially those that reflect the Mississippi State University History Department’s strengths in the history of science and technology; agricultural, rural, and environmental history; military and diplomatic history; the Civil War; gender history; African American history and civil rights; and the American South.

The paper should be based on original research in primary sources. Interested should submit a proposal or abstract of not more than 400 words to Dr. Andrew Lang and Dr. Muey Saeteurn at SHUR@lists.msstate.edu by March 1, 2017. Students whose papers have been accepted will be notified by March 15, 2017. The History Department will offset the costs of one night’s lodging for presenters and provide a BBQ banquet dinner on the Symposium’s opening night.

SHUR is on Facebook at facebook.com/MSStateSHUR

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Posted in News, Upcoming Events


Reporter Destiny Alexander describes Banks', long-time visiting professor in the DPH and active JSU alumni, work with Rev. Eddie Carthans to bring new economic and educational opportunities to Holmes County.  "We want a brighter future for all residents there and will promote education as a major means for achieving economic growth and prosperity throughout Holmes County,” Banks explains.

Read more.

Posted in News


Jackson State University’s Margaret Walker Center has received a $300,000 grant from the NoVo Foundation to work with young women of color throughout the South in conjunction with Natalie Collier and the Lighthouse project.

Founded by a gift from businessman Warren Buffett, the NoVo Foundation – “Novo” the latin word that can mean to make anew, refresh, revive, change, alter, invent – states that their mission is to foster a transformation from a world of domination and exploitation to one of collaboration and partnership, according to the foundation’s website.

The Lighthouse project—to be housed at the Margaret Walker Center on the campus of Jackson State University—targets southern girls with a responsibility “to be a revelatory, unflickering light for black girls and young women in the southern United States by providing a safe space and focused programming to address their personal, social and leadership development needs.”

Collier created and will direct The Lighthouse project. Collier has spent the past five years doing young women’s leadership development, curriculum design and grant making at the Children’s Defense Fund – Southern Regional Office and Southern Rural Black Women’s Initiative for Economic and Social Justice.

“When Natalie approached me about the participation of the Margaret Walker Center in this project,” notes Center Director, Dr. Robert Luckett, “I jumped at the opportunity.  It seemed like a perfect fit for us and our work to promote the African-American experience.”

The renewable grant gives Collier the opportunity to incubate and leverage her experiences working with young women and girls in the South to focus more fully on creating a more balanced, equitable world by changing social attitudes, relationships and institutions that perpetuate injustice for girls and young women, especially black southern ones.

“I’m so fortunate to have this opportunity to expand the work I’ve been doing for the past several years—affirming girls and young women through the CDF and SRBWI,” Collier says. “I look forward to learning more, teaching more and partnering with individuals, organizations and institutions committed to the success and uplift of girls and young women, who are the backbones of so many of our communities.”

As Collier sees it, “a falsehood has pervaded American culture as fact: Girls are fine. Because of this, girls and young women are too often neglected to focus on boys and young men, and this is especially the case when the conversation focuses on girls of color.” She continues, “This negligence provides a false choice and assumes that advocates, activists, organizers, and thought leaders aren’t sharp enough to focus on both. What is certain is girls are not and cannot be fine if no one is paying attention to them. The Lighthouse will redress this issue.”

Posted in News


49th Annual MLK Convocation

January 12th, 2017 by history

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Posted in News