Faculty Research

Felix A. Okojie1*, Martha Tchounwou2, and Dickson Idusuyi3

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to address best practices capable of bridging the retention and completion gaps in STEM education for underrepresentedminority students. Using a phenomenologicaldesign, this article delineates Louis Stokes Mississippi Alliance for Minority Participation (LSMAMP) program experiences, instructional strategies, institutional practices and students’ persistence within the LSMAMP community. Five main themes emerged from the student interviews and survey results: (1) early exposure to STEM and familial support; (2) hands on involvement and academic intervention activities; (3) Peer group support; (4) institutional environment and infrastructural support; and (5) financial incentives. The top choices of faculty and site coordinators about institutional and instructional practices and learning strategies that enhance student learning and degree attainment were faculty mentoring, student opportunities to present research at or attend professional conferences, peer tutoring, and student opportunities to connect prior learning to new lecture content.

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Ariel Taylor1, Felix A. Okojie2

1Faith Family Academy, Dallas, Texas
2Executive Ph.D. Program in Urban Higher Education, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand systemic factors that impact the progression of women beyond middle level administrative roles within four year higher education institutions. There is currently a wide body of research addressing the shortage of women in senior leadership positions in higher education but a gap exists in research covering systemic factors affecting the advancement of mid-level women leaders. This study included female mid-level administrators from two four-year universities: one PWI and one HBCU. Qualitative research design through the feminist lens of Degendering Organizational Resilience guided this study. This study identified salient factors and practices including gendered leadership, traditional culture, invited but not accepted, degendered language, imposition of gendered expectations and “Like You” patterns that impact mid-level women leaders from advancing.

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By: James Samuel Maddirala, Rachel V Gumbi, James Perkins, Sebastian Ousepperampil, Pamela D Moore, Loretta Jones, Sidney McNairy, Keith C Norris

Office of Academic Affairs and Student Life, Jackson State University, PO Box 17199, Jackson, MS 39217-0299, USA.Ethnicity & disease (Impact Factor: 1.12). 01/2008; 18(2 Suppl 2):S2-185-8. Source: PubMed The Global-World HIV/AIDS Alliance (GHAA) is a collaboration of representatives from civil society, faith-based organizations, institutions of higher education, and government agencies who are pooling resources specific to their respective organizations' missions to assist with enhancing education and early treatment for HIV/AIDS in marginalized and medically underserved communities worldwide. The Alliances' partnerships are divided into five geographically oriented operational groups (called clusters), which are the Africa Regional Cluster, Asia Regional Cluster, Europe Regional Cluster, Latin-Caribbean Cluster, and United States Cluster.

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By:  Mario J. Azevedo, PhD, MPH, James S. Maddirala, PhD, Shonda Lawrence, PhD, MSW, Kira L. Johnson

This study is an overview of the most current state of the US prison system relative to incarcerated women, focusing specifically on the risks of HIV and opportunistic diseases that affect women’s health and lacking concerted interest in understanding and addressing women’s specific needs by policy-makers and managers of our prison facilities. Methodology : Conducted by an interdisciplinary team of socio-behavioral scientists in epidemiology, social work, policy, and education, the study relies on the most updated research data provided by federal and state government agencies, hospital registries, biomedical, public health, and socio-behavioral databases, relevant and peer-reviewed research studies published in journals and other accepted information sources, using a comparative national and global approach to the subject of female prisoners and the impact of infectious diseases.

Publisher: Global Journals Inc. (USA) Global Journal of HUMAN SOCIAL SCIENCE S , Volume 13 Issue 2 Version 1.0 Year 2013. Type: Double Blind Peer Reviewed International Research Journal. Online ISSN: 2249-460x & Print ISSN: 0975-587X

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Brown, W. & Bobo, A. D. (April 2014) The impact of socialization upon African American doctoral students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs at public universities. American Educational Research Association Conference (AERA), Philadelphia, PA.

Brown, W.A. & Glusco, T. (November 2013) The Impact of technology on promotion and tenure. Association for the Study of Higher Education Conference (ASHE), St. Louis MS.

Brown, W. & Burnette D. E (April, 2013) An analysis of public higher education finance: Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Expenditures. American Educational Research Association Conference (AERA), San Francisco, Ca.

Brown & Steib. L.L (April 2013) Community college retention: Understanding non-traditional student success. American Educational Research Association Conference (AERA), San Francisco, Ca.

Brown, W & Cunningham, A. J (February 2013) Generation status, self esteem, academic self efficacy and perceived social support; Their role in first generation graduate students psychological well being. National Association of African American Studies Conference, Baton Rouge, LA.

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By: Kendra L. Preer, Ph.D., Stark State College, Ohio | James Samuel Maddirala, Ph.D., Jackson State University, Mississippi

The purpose of this study was to investigate African-American student experiences and perceptions of intraracial campus diversity and learn more about their overall beliefs regarding the institutional practices and policies associated with diversity at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Specifically, the study sought to gain a greater understanding of the role and influence of intraracial differences and gain insight into how Black students experience diversity on majority campuses. The study represented a break with the small body of research examining African-American student heterogeneity, which largely consists of dialogues about racial and ethnic diversity viewed primarily from a Black versus White dichotomy.

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By: Dr. Andrea T. Cunningham, Alabama A&M University | Dr. Walter A. Brown, Jackson State University

The purpose of this study is to extend previous research conducted by Wang and Castaneda-Sound (2008) that examined the influences of generational status, self-esteem, academic self-efficacy, and perceived social support on undergraduate first generation college (FGC) students’ wellbeing. This research explored how the previously mentioned variables affected FGC students on the graduate level. It also attempted to confirm the findings on students on the undergraduate level.

As first generation college (FGC) students continue to increase in numbers at colleges and universities, administrators must acknowledge and deal with the issues which accompany them. This is especially true for first generation students on the graduate level. If challenges such as lack of preparation for college and psychosomatic issues are not mitigated on the undergraduate level, the persistence of graduate students may be affected.

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